The Secure Times

An online forum of the ABA Section of Antitrust Law's Privacy and Information Security Committee


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Canada’s Anti-Spam Law (CASL) in force July 1

Canada’s Anti-Spam Law (CASL) enters into force on Canada Day, July 1.  It was passed in 2010 as a “made-in-Canada” solution to “drive spammers out of Canada“. 

Are you outside Canada?  It’s important to know that this law reaches beyond Canada’s borders.  CASL is already affecting businesses in the United States, Europe and elsewhere as they change their communications practices to send emails and other “commercial electronic messages” into Canada. 

As we have described in our presentation Comparing CASL to CAN-SPAM, the new law applies to messages that are accessed by a computer system in Canada.  That means that messages sent by a person, business or organization outside of Canada, to a person in Canada, are subject to the law.

CASL expressly provides for sharing information among the Government of Canada, the Canadian CASL enforcement agencies, and “the government of a foreign state” or international organization, for the purposes of administering CASL’s anti-spam (and other) provisions.  The MOU among the Canadian CASL enforcement agencies similarly references processes to share and disseminate information received from and provided to their foreign counterpart agencies. 

In a speech on June 26, the Chair of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, Jean-Pierre Blais, emphasized the CRTC’s cooperation with its international counterparts to combat unlawful telemarketers, hackers and spammers that “often operate outside our borders“.  The Chairman specifically named “the Federal Trade Commission in the U.S., the Office of Communication (OFCOM) in the U.K., the Authority for Consumers and Markets in the Netherlands, the Australian Communications and Media Authority and others”, and noted that the CRTC has led or participated in many international networks on unlawful telecommunications.

Companies should also take note that a violation of CASL might also result in the CRTC exercising its so-called “name and shame” power, by posting the name of the offender and the violation on its online compliance and enforcement list.  The CRTC has for years published notices of violation with respect to its “Do Not Call List”, and is expected to take a similar approach for CASL notices of violation as well. 

The CRTC recently published a Compliance and Enforcement Bulletin on its Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules and on CASL, available here.  The CRTC recommends implementing a corporate compliance program as part of a due diligence defence: 

Commission staff may take into consideration the existence and implementation of an effective corporate compliance program if the business presents the program as part of a due diligence defence in response to an alleged violation of the Rules or CASL. Although the pre-existence of a corporate compliance program may not be sufficient as a  complete defence to allegations of violations under the Rules or CASL, a credible and effective documented program may enable a business to demonstrate that it took  reasonable steps to avoid contravening the law.

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Canada’s Anti-Spam Legislation: A road map to “commercial electronic messages”

Let’s take stock of the information currently available on Canada’s Anti-Spam Legislation (CASL).  First, there is the Act itself.  Next, there are:

If you still have questions about the circumstances in which you can send a commercial electronic message (CEM) under CASL, you’re not alone. 

The following one-page overview is intended as a guide to the various scenarios contemplated under CASL.  As an “at a glance” reference, it is not intended as legal advice, and is not a substitute for consulting CASL and the various regulations and bulletins noted above.  It should, however, serve as a high level road-map through the maze.

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