The Secure Times

An online forum of the ABA Section of Antitrust Law's Privacy and Information Security Committee

FTC v. Wyndham Update, Part 2

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Update (April 10, 2014): For a more recent update on this case, please see this post.

Since our last update, there has been some interesting activity in the matter concerning the Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) complaint against Wyndham Worldwide, currently pending before the U.S. District Court for the District of New Jersey, and I thought this might be a good time for an update on these proceedings. This case has drawn considerable attention, mainly due to Wyndham’s challenge of the FTC’s authority to bring a data security enforcement action on unfairness grounds under Section 5 of the FTC Act. The outcome in this matter may very well have a profound effect on the FTC’s ability to regulate data security.

When we last discussed this matter, Wyndham’s motions to dismiss the FTC’s complaint, asserting, inter alia, that the FTC lacked the legal authority to enforce data security standards for private businesses, were before the court. On November 7, 2013, Judge Esther Salas heard oral argument on these motions. Wyndham opened by citing FDA v. Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp., 529 U.S. 120 (2000), as support for their proposition that the FTC’s data security standards exceeded the agency’s authority. Judge Salas remained skeptical during the hearing, stating that she thought Brown & Williamson was distinguishable.

Wyndham further argued that the FTC’s informal data security guidelines are insufficient, and do not provide fair notice of what is required under Section 5. Wyndham questioned both the FTC’s authority as well as their expertise in this area. The FTC countered by asserting that its data security guidelines, which include best practices and past consent decrees, put businesses on notice of what is required to meet a standard of reasonableness.

Following oral argument, Judge Salas denied Wyndham’s motion to stay discovery proceedings, but did not immediately address Wyndham’s other pending motions to dismiss. On December 27, Judge Salas ordered the parties to submit a supplemental, joint letter brief to the Court, addressing the two outstanding motions to dismiss. The parties filed their joint letter brief on January 21.

In the brief, Wyndham once again argued that the FTC lacks the statutory authority to regulate data security practices for every American company. Wyndham pointed out that Congress has limited the FTC’s data security power to only certain, well-defined areas, citing the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (GLBA), and the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) as evidence of these boundaries. Wyndham dismissed the FTC’s argument that FCRA, GLBA, and COPPA merely supplement the FTC’s existing data security authority as “revisionist history.”

In addition, Wyndham refuted the theory first raised by the FTC at oral argument, that Congress “understood Section 5 to provide the FTC with general police power over data-security matters,” but enacted FCRA, GLBA, and COPPA “for the limited purpose of freeing the Commission from the need to prove substantial consumer injury in specific contexts” as “a far-fetched reconstruction” of Congressional intent. Wyndham cited the context and legislative history of the FCRA, GLBA, and COPPA as further proof that the FTC is exceeding its authority, stating that Congress enacted these statutes “precisely because it believed that data security was not covered by existing statutory provisions, including Section 5 of the FTC Act.” (emphasis in original).

Finally, Wyndham reasserted that, even if the FTC is correct in its understanding of the statutes, they have not provided businesses fair notice required by the Due Process Clause. Wyndham points out that the “FTC has not published any rules, regulations, or guidelines explaining to businesses what data-security protections they must employ to comply with the FTC’s interpretation of Section 5 of the FTC Act.” This has been a growing concern among U.S. businesses, which face a daily struggle against data breaches and other related information security incidents, and are unsure of what “reasonable data security practices” might mean.

In its section of the brief, the FTC responded by asserting that “Section 5 of the FTC Act applies by its terms to all unfair commercial practices,” and “is not susceptible to a ‘data security’ exception.” The FTC highlighted the recent LabMD and Verizon decisions as supporting their argument for statutory authority.

The FTC also reiterated its position that the FCRA, GLBA, and COPPA permit the FTC to enforce these statutes using “additional enforcement tools,” which differentiate them from the FTC Act. Further, the FTC argues that where the FTC Act “merely authorizes,” the FCRA, GLBA, and COPPA “affirmatively compel the FTC to use its authority in particular ways” in certain contexts, which does not “divest the [FTC] of its preexisting and much broader authority to protect consumers against ‘unfair’ practices.”

Finally, the FTC pointed out that, while the court did not request additional briefing on the due process question, they felt obliged to respond to Wyndham’s claim on this point. The FTC asserted that to follow Wyndham’s argument would “undermine 100 years of FTC precedent,” and would “crash headlong” into Supreme Court precedent regarding Section 5 of the FTC Act.

Of note, the FTC has also been making similar arguments before Congress, where the FTC has expressed its support for new data security legislation. In hearings held before House Energy and Commerce Committee, the FTC emphasized its ongoing efforts to promote data security through civil law enforcement, education, and policy initiatives.

The court accepted parties’ brief and submissions of supplemental authority on January 23, and granted Wyndham’s request to submit a five-page letter brief in order to respond to the substantive issues raised by the FTC’s inclusion of the LabMD and Verizon decisions. Wyndham filed this brief on January 29, citing multiple negative responses to these decisions in the press as evidence of a breach of the “fundamental principles of fair notice” that “imposes substantial costs on business.”

Judge Salas has not yet responded to these arguments, but we will certainly be keeping a very close eye on these proceedings and its implications for the FTC regulation of data security standards.

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Author: Jeffrey L. Vagle

Jeffrey L. Vagle is an associate with Pepper Hamilton LLP, resident in the Philadelphia office. Mr. Vagle concentrates his practice on privacy, data security, Internet law, and technology-related matters.

One thought on “FTC v. Wyndham Update, Part 2

  1. Pingback: FTC v. Wyndham Update | The Secure Times

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