The Secure Times

An online forum of the ABA Section of Antitrust Law's Privacy and Information Security Committee

House Judiciary Committee Debates Mandatory Data Retention Requirements

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On January 25, 2011, the United States House of Representatives Committee on the Judiciary’s Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, and Homeland Security (“Crime Subcommittee”) held a hearing regarding Internet service providers’ (“ISP”) and web hosting companies’, such as social-networking sites, data retention policies. According to a representative from the Department of Justice, who testified at the hearing, ISPs’ disparate data retention policies hamper criminal investigations and other law enforcement and prosecutor initiatives. The Department of Justice has recommended that Congress create mandatory data retention requirements to help facilitate law enforcement and prosecutor activities. No specific legislation was proposed during the Crime Subcommittee hearing; rather, legislators, and agency and industry representatives explored the need for data retention requirements.

Privacy advocates have questioned the implication of mandatory data retention requirements that would require entities to maintain sensitive consumer data, such as personally identifiable Internet address information, email, instant messaging correspondence, and what Web pages users visit. For example, past data retention legislation would have required certain Internet companies to maintain Internet protocol addresses for two years. These data retention proposals conflict with recent agency privacy-protection suggestions advocating the storage of less consumer data, such as the Federal Trade Commission’s proposed privacy framework, which suggests that businesses should “retain[] consumer data for only as long as they have a specific and legitimate business need to do so.”

More information regarding the Crime Subcommittee’s hearing is available here.

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Author: ABA Antitrust

Learn more about the ABA Section of Antitrust Law: http://ambar.org/antitrust

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