The Secure Times

An online forum of the ABA Section of Antitrust Law's Privacy and Information Security Committee


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Amendments to CalOPPA Allow Minors to “Erase” Information from the Internet and Also Restricts Advertising Practices to Minors

On September 23, 2013, California Governor Jerry Brown signed SB568 into law, which adds new provisions to the California Online Privacy Protection Act. Officially called “Privacy Rights for California Minors in the Digital World,” the bill has already garnered the nickname of the “Internet Eraser Law,” because it affords California minors the ability to remove content or information previously posted on a Web site. The bill also imposes restrictions on advertising to California minors.

California Minors’ Right to Remove Online Content

Effective January 1, 2015, the bill requires online operators to provide a means by which California minors may remove online information posted by that minor. Online operators can elect to allow a minor to directly remove such information or can alternatively remove such information at a minor’s request. The bill further requires that online operators notify California minors of the right to remove previously-posted information.

Online operators do not need to allow removal of information in certain circumstances, including where (1) the content or information was posted by a third party; (2) state or federal law requires the operator or third party to retain such content or information; or (3) the operator anonymizes the content or information. The bill further clarifies that online operators need only remove the information from public view; the bill does not require wholesale deletion of the information from the online operator’s servers.

New Restrictions on Advertising to California Minors

Also effective January 1, 2015, the bill places new restrictions on advertising to California minors. The bill prohibits online services directed to minors from advertising certain products, including alcohol, firearms, tobacco, and tanning services. It further prohibits online operators from allowing third parties (e.g. advertising networks or plug-ins) to advertise certain products to minors. And where an advertising service is notified that a particular site is directed to minors, the bill restricts the types of products that can be advertised by that advertising service to minors.

Implications

Given the sheer number of California minors, these amendments to CalOPPA will likely have vast implications for online service providers. First, the bill extends not just to Web sites, but also to mobile apps, which is consistent with a general trend of governmental scrutiny of mobile apps. Online service providers should expect regulation of mobile apps to increase, as both California and the Federal Trade Commission have issued publications indicating concerns over mobile app privacy. Second, the bill also reflects an increased focus on privacy of children and minors. Developers should consider these privacy issues when designing Web sites and mobile apps, and design such products with the flexibility needed to adapt to changing legislation. Thus, any business involved in the online space should carefully review these amendments and ensure compliance before the January 1, 2015 deadline.


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